Peggy Bird – Believing Again (Book 5, Second Chances series)

believing

Author: Peggy Bird
Reviewed by: Aggie
Publisher: Crimson Romance
Genre: M/F Contemporary
ISBN 13: 9781440567803

Rating: ★★★☆☆ 

 

Summary:

As the youngest woman ever to make detective in the Portland Police Bureau, Danny Hartmann has racked up an impressive record. It doesn’t keep her warm at night, but it does make up for feeling she’s somehow disappointed her family with her career choice. Called to the scene of the murder of a homeless veteran in a transient camp, Danny doesn’t expect it to be anything other than another case she clears.

Then she meets the man who made the 9-1-1 call and everything changes.

Jake Abrams, a volunteer doctor at the Veterans Medical Services Clinic, doesn’t have much faith in anything other than his work and the vets he cares deeply about. Not shy about voicing his opinions, even to the cops investigating the murder of one of his patients, he annoys Danny with his snarky remarks.

However, working the case, she has to rely on Jake to help her find her way around the transient camps under the bridges and in the city’s huge wilderness park. As they work together, their attraction becomes mutual and passionate.

But Jake has demons. Like the vets he cares for, he carries scars both mental and physical from his service in the National Guard in Iraq. He fears Danny will turn from him in disgust when she discovers them. She’s afraid his experience in Iraq makes it impossible for him to love someone who does what she does for a living.

When the murderer of the homeless vets comes too close to Jake, it’ll be up to Danny to save his life. It’ll be up to their love for each other to save them both.  

Review:
This book was sort of frustrating for this reviewer. The plot was interesting yet I couldn’t really connect with the characters, particularly the male ones, who to me, seemed the typical alpha stereotypes that are prevalent in most romance novels.
I am writing this review just a few days after Veteran’s Day, so it seems rather ironic that ” Believing Again, ” has the female heroine, Danny Hartmann, a Portland, Oregon, detective looking into the senseless shootings of homeless veterans, many of whom have Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. The killings make no sense, and in fact, are just cruel. They are being gunned down like stray animals. Danny finds herself working with one, Dr. Jake Abrams, a former veteran himself, who runs a clinic and treats many of the vets who live in tent cities. When she meets him he gives her attitude and she gives it right back. So of course, they are going to find themselves attracted to each other. And will, in fact, wind up knocking boots and begin a relationship, while her nosy ass partner, Sam Richardson, takes it upon himself to grill her about her personal life. Really, dude?
The best thing about ” Believing Again ” was Danny Hartmann. She was a great protagonist. Ms. Bird did a wonderful job creating a female cop who is tough, no nonsense, and essentially married to the job. She has her priorities in line. She doesn’t have time for a man or a real relationship. She isn’t a shrinking violet. And she put Jake Abrams in his place when he needed it.
The only thing I didn’t like about her was that she wasn’t sexually aggressive enough in the bedroom. One would think that a female cop, when it comes time to do the bedspring boogie, would be jumping all over her partner with enthusiasm and vigor. Nope. The good male doctor took the lead in just about all the scenes and seemed to control where the sex was going. I think Danny was on top once in the book. But the sex scenes weren’t that great anyway. This disappointed me. I always like women to be more active in sex scenes. I think the male characters, especially, Abrams, were a bit sexist.
Over all, it was an ok read. Readers may not guess who the killer is or the motive behind the killings. I didn’t, myself, but when the killer was revealed I just didn’t believe it nor could I believe the motives behind them.
Still, it wasn’t the worst read. Just not the best.

 

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